1. Skrillex Music Is Not Enough To Keep You Safe From Mosquitoes  Forbes
  2. Killer dengue fever-carrying mosquitoes are on the rise in Australia  Daily Mail
  3. Skrillex’s Music could help fight Zika, chikungunya, dengue  ZME Science
  4. Europe set to suffer as climate change brings mosquito threat  Al Jazeera English
  5. Dengue fever: Entire world’s population to be at risk, climate change to blame  The New Daily
  6. View full coverage on Google News
A new study suggests that a Skrillex track may prevent mosquitoes from mating and biting. But listening to music is not a safe method to protect yourself from mosquito bites.A new study suggests that a Skrillex track may prevent mosquitoes from mating and biting. But listening to music is not a safe method to protect yourself from mosquito bites.

Mosquitoes Don't Like Skrillex, But Listening To His Music Isn't Enough To Keep Them Away

Millions more people could be exposed to mosquito-borne diseases in coming years amid global warming, experts say.Millions more people could be exposed to mosquito-borne diseases in coming years amid global warming, experts say.

Europe set to suffer as climate change brings mosquito threat | News | Al Jazeera

Killer dengue fever-carrying mosquitoes are on the rise in Australia as the pesky population has exploded with recent rain. Killer dengue fever-carrying mosquitoes are on the rise in Australia as the pesky population has exploded with recent rain. 

Killer dengue fever-carrying mosquitoes are on the rise in Australia | Daily Mail Online

Dubstep seems to entertain mosquitoes, which become less interested in feeding on humans or having sex.Dubstep seems to entertain mosquitoes, which become less interested in feeding on humans or having sex.

Skrillex’s Music could help fight Zika, chikungunya, dengue

A billion more people will be newly exposed to mosquito-borne diseases like dengue fever as global warming hits its stride over the next 60 years, according to modelling by US researchers.A billion more people will be newly exposed to mosquito-borne diseases like dengue fever as global warming hits its stride over the next 60 years, according to modelling by US researchers.

Dengue fever: Entire world's population to be at risk, climate change to blame